Sunday, May 16, 2010

How To Draw A Roof Plan

A roof plan is a view from the top of the house that shows the geometry in flat view of a roof. Drawing a roof plan is not a difficult task if you already have a grasp of basic drafting. A roof plan is derived from a floor plan and the exterior (elevations) views of the house.

On a drafting board, it is a simple matter of placing the floor plan under a transparent sheet, tracing the perimeter exterior walls, and then measuring beyond those walls using an architectural scale to where the overhang (fascia) of the house will be. And then projecting lines from the exterior views you can determine where one part of the roof comes together with the other in peaks and valleys.

In a CAD system, we would do the same thing. A line would be drawn around the parameter of the home, and then offset the distance of the overhang.

You would then measure to each individual peak of the roof and draw a line representing it. Then, if the roof has more complexity, valleys, crickets (little roofs that shed water from a possible water or snow trap), and shed roofs would be drawn using the same method. Once this drawing is completed, it can be used to draw a rafter plan showing how the roof system goes together.

To learn to draw Roof Plans, go to http://homedesign.8m.com/roofs/

Other related searches would be: how to draw roof plan, How to Draw Architectural Plans, drawing roof plans, drawing your own house plans, roof detail plan, how to draw house blueprints

About the Author

If you want to learn other types of drafting in a virtual classroom on the internet go to http://draftingservice.us/school/ where House Plan Drafting 101 is included along with how to draw site plans, blueprint reading, mechanical drafting, and a whole lot more.

1 comment:

Rob Minialoff said...

Thanks for this post, Tim! One thing that I consider on drawing a roof plan are the different perspectives. It’s just a roof, but it could be difficult to model if you don’t let your imagination go beyond various angles of respective dimensions.

Rob Minialof